Women like to get to the airport earlier than men, survey reveals

One of the biggest hassles of travel for me is having to wait at the airport, which is pretty much in line with a recent survey that found women are more eager than men to get to the airport early in order to avoid missing their flights.

A survey of 230 travellers, commissioned by the GO Group, LLC, an international ground transportation provider, found that 47 per cent of women preferred to get to the airport at least two hours in advance of departure time for a domestic flight compared to only 39 per cent of men.

More men (42 per cent) thought 90 minutes was the ideal time to arrive, although an equal number of women agreed. Meanwhile, 14 per cent of men thought an hour was enouugh time as did 10 per cent of women. Unsurprisingly, no one thought 30 minutes was enough time.

The results were different for international flights, with 44 per cent of women and 39 per cent of men saying they arrived three or more hours prior to their departure time. The preferred time was two hours with half of the men (50 per cent) and women (52 per cent) choosing that amount of time. Only eight per cent of men and two per cent of women said 90 minutes was their target, while another two per cent cut things close, arriving just one hour prior to their scheduled departure.

Clearly, how you respond to the question depends a lot on the airport you are leaving from and the time of day. All I know is that no matter how much I tell myself I will leave later for the airport to avoid waiting, I still end up spending far too much time sitting at the departure gate.

 

One country has a third of the world’s airports

The country with the most airports in the world, more than 33 per cent of the global total, is the United States.

As of 2017, the U.S. boasted 14,263 airports, 5,104 which were public airports.

The countries with the next largest number of airports are Brazil and Mexico with 4,093 and 1,714 airports respectively.

The origins of the world’s airport codes don’t always make sense

The world’s airports are identified by three-letter codes known as IATA station identifiers. You’ve no doubt seen them on your baggage tags when you were flying somewhere.

Some of them are abbreviations of the cities they are located in like MEX for Aeropuerto Internacional Benito Juárez in Mexico City while others are derived from the airport’s name like JFK for John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City.

Some, however, seem to make no sense, but they are often references to historical names like ORD for O’Hare in Chicago. It’s former name was Orchard Field. And in the case of Canada, it gets complicated with which one has a weather station and which one does not.

It’s all explained on this Wikipedia page.

Listen to live air traffic control radio on LiveATC.net

Listening to air traffic controllers on the radio is not an activity that appeals to everyone, but there are enough aviation geeks out there that it has spawned an entire website that collects dozens of live streams from airports around the world. Get your #avgeek fix on LiveATC.net

https://www.liveatc.net/

Flight Connections shows you all the flights from any airport

You can pretty much fly from any one point on Earth to another within a day or two, but chances are you’d have to make multiple connections to do so. Flight Connections shows you the direct flights from every major airport so you can plot your travels most efficiently.

http://www.flightconnections.com/

Remembering Solari boards

Before the advent of TV monitors, airport terminals presented arrival and departure times on electro-mechanical split-flap displays. They were commonly known as Solari boards after their Italian manufacturer or as Pragotrons for those who bought them from their Czech competitor. Travellers old enough to remember the displays can tell you they made a distinctive clatter whenever the times were refreshed.