Daily travel news for 2021-07-20: U.K. travel warning, Mixing vaccines and Canadian museums and residential schools

    • For more evidence that the “end of the pandemic” is not evenly distributed, the U.S. has warned Americans to not travel to the U.K… https://t.co/bkNEO50GjW
    • If you’ve been vaccinated by a mix of vaccines, like AstraZeneca and Pfizer, then some cruise lines consider you to be unvaccinated… https://t.co/WvW8FMOSJE

 

Daily travel news for 2021-07-19: Family resorts without your kids, The benefit of backpackers and Canada’s border re-opening

    • #Backpackers’ money is more likely go directly to local communities, research shows, while their environmental impact is lower than more monied tourists… https://t.co/BcNm9vxV1H
    • At long last, Canada’s borders are re-opening to travellers. Fully-vaccinated Americans can enter Canada Aug. 9, while the rest of the world is welcome as of Sept. 7… https://t.co/d630ja2jXi

Canada’s hotel quarantine ending and more airports will welcome international flights as of Aug. 9

As part of its phased re-opening of the country’s international borders to fully-vaccinated travellers, the Government of Canada announced Monday that it is ending its mandatory hotel quarantine program as of August 9 and expanding the list of airports that will accept international flights into the country. 

Effective August 9, 2021, international flights carrying passengers will be permitted to land at the following five additional Canadian airports in addition to Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver and Calgary:

  • Halifax Stanfield International Airport
  • Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport
  • Ottawa Macdonald–Cartier International Airport
  • Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport
  • Edmonton International Airport.

These airports, in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and Transport Canada, are working to implement the measures necessary to safely welcome international passengers as soon as possible after August 9, as conditions dictate.

As of that date, Canada plans to begin allowing entry to American citizens and permanent residents, who are currently residing in the United States, and have been fully vaccinated at least 14 days prior to entering Canada for non-essential travel. This preliminary step allows for the Government of Canada to fully operationalize the adjusted border measures ahead of September 7, 2021, and recognizes the many close ties between Canadians and Americans.

On September 7, 2021, provided that the domestic epidemiologic situation remains favourable, the government intends to open Canada’s borders to any fully-vaccinated travellers who have completed the full course of vaccination with a Government of Canada-accepted vaccine at least 14 days prior to entering Canada and who meet specific entry requirements.

“Thanks to the extraordinary commitment of Canadians to getting vaccinated and following public health advice, we are seeing improvement in the public health situation in Canada. As a result, today we announced new steps in our re-opening approach, including that international flights carrying passengers will be allowed to land at five more Canadian airports,” said Transport Minister Omar Alghabra in a news release.

All travellers, regardless of vaccination status, will still require a pre-entry COVID-19 molecular test result. However effective August 9, 2021, the Government of Canada is adjusting its post-arrival testing strategy for fully vaccinated travellers. Using a new border testing surveillance program at airports and land border crossings, fully-vaccinated travellers will not need a post-arrival test unless they have been randomly selected to complete a Day 1 COVID-19 molecular test. There are no changes to the mandatory testing requirements for unvaccinated travellers.

With the advent of increased vaccination rates in Canada, declining COVID-19 cases and reduced pressure on health care capacity, the three-night government authorized hotel stay requirement will be eliminated for all travellers arriving by air as of 12:01 A.M. EDT on August 9. Fully-vaccinated travellers who meet the requirements will be exempt from quarantine; however, all travellers must still provide a quarantine plan and be prepared to quarantine, in case it is determined at the border that they do not meet the necessary requirements.

This strategy allows the Government of Canada to continue monitoring variants of concern in Canada and vaccine effectiveness. Using these layers of protection, the Government of Canada can monitor the COVID-19 situation in Canada, respond quickly to threats, and guide decisions on restricting international travel.

Subject to limited exceptions, all travellers must use ArriveCAN (app or web portal) to submit their travel information. If they are eligible to enter Canada and meet specific criteria, fully vaccinated travellers will not have to quarantine upon arrival in Canada.

While Canada continues to trend in the right direction, the epidemiological situation and vaccination coverage is not the same around the world. The Government of Canada continues to advise Canadians to avoid non-essential travel outside of Canada – international travel increases your risk of exposure to COVID-19 and its variants, as well as of spreading it to others. Border measures also remain subject to change as the epidemiological situation evolves. As Canada looks to welcome fully-vaccinated travellers from the U.S., the federal government will continue to monitor the situation and provide updated travel advice to Canadians.

Malahat Skywalk adds to Canada’s growing list of elevated attractions

With the official opening of Malahat SkyWalk on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island last week, Canada has added another “skywalk” attraction.

Located about 35 minutes drive from Victoria, Malahat SkyWalk visitors embark along a 600 m (1,968 ft) elevated, wooden walkway rising 20 m (65 ft) through an arbutus and Douglas fir forest. Guests then ascend a circular ramp gently rising to the top of a 10-storey, architecturally-inspiring spiral tower lookout.

At the top of the tower, guests are 250 m (820 ft) above sea level and enjoy 360-degree views of two countries, including islands, inlets, fjords, forests and mountains in B.C. and Washington State. Also at the top, daring guests can walk on an adventure net suspended partially across the centre of the tower for another thrilling perspective.

On the descent, guests can choose to retrace their steps or take an exhilarating ride down a 20 m (65 ft) spiral slide. Available to everyone over five years of age or minimum 107 cm (42 in) tall, guests can ride as many times as they like.

Malahat SkyWalk is located on the traditional territory of the Malahat Nation and their Indigenous stories are embedded in the visitor experience.

Tickets are available online at www.malahatskywalk.com/pass and are valid for one year from date of purchase. Admission is $31.95 CAD (adult 18+), $28.95 CAD (senior 65+), $18.95 CAD (child aged 6-17) and $86.00 CAD (two adults, two children), plus taxes. Children aged five and under are free.

If you want more skywalking adventures, here are some other elevated attractions you can experience in Canada:

Columbia Icefield Skywalk
Jasper, Alberta

Step out on a cliff-edge walkway where giant glaciers perch above you and the spectacular Sunwapta Valley spreads out below. The Columbia Icefield Skywalk experience features waterfalls, wildlife, fossils and more on an exciting 1-kilometre walkway that leads to a platform where glass is all that separates you from a 918-foot (280 m) drop. The walk is presented in an interpretive storytelling format that will connect you to the natural world in a deep and meaningful way.

https://www.banffjaspercollection.com/attractions/columbia-icefield/skywalk/

Saint John Skywalk
Saint John, New Brunswick

Handout photo: Saint John Skwyalk

The Reversing Falls Rapids on the Saint John River in New Brunswick have amazed visitors for generations. As the powerful tides of the Bay of Fundy rush up the river twice per day, they reverse the direction of the river’s flow that is an unforgettable demonstration of nature’s power. Visitors can step out on the glass-bottomed skywalk that perches above the roiling waters below. There’s also an adjacent restaurant that they can visit before or after the tide’s approach

https://www.skywalksaintjohn.com

CN Tower’s Glass Floor
Toronto, Ontario

Handout photo: CN Tower

The granddaddy of all glass-bottomed attractions in Canada is the CN Tower’s glass floor that was the world’s first when it opened in 1994. A mere 2 1/2″ of glass keeps you safe from the ground which is 342 m (1,122 ft) below, but it’s strong enough that you can walk on it, or even jump on it, without worry. Despite those reassurances, you have to force your mind to tell you that it’s safe when you step out on the transparent 23.8 square metres (256 sq. ft) surface. If that’s not scary enough for you, then you might be ready for the EdgeWalk, where you walk outside the tower while attached with safety straps.

https://www.cntower.ca/en-ca/plan-your-visit/attractions/glass-floor.html

 

Daily travel news for 2021-07-16: Mixed vaccines not recognized, Re-opening Canada’s border and Anthony Bourdain’s robo-voice

Pfizer COVID vaccine
    • So, if you’re like many Canadians with mixed vaccine doses against COVID, myself included, international #travel is a question mark because some countries don’t accept the practice… https://t.co/eMmSZKCEQZ
    • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Thursday Canada could start allowing fully-vaccinated Americans into Canada as early as mid-August … https://t.co/rrzIOsHxcA
    • The makers of an Anthony Bourdain documentary are getting roasted because they used an AI version of his voice to recreate some of his quotes… https://t.co/gS7LuvSTrm
    • It’s a bit unsettling to learn that because of limited housing, tourists visiting Quebec’s Magdalen Islands tourism, it’s causing some people to become homeless… https://t.co/caoupEcvv4