Malahat Skywalk adds to Canada’s growing list of elevated attractions

With the official opening of Malahat SkyWalk on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island last week, Canada has added another “skywalk” attraction.

Located about 35 minutes drive from Victoria, Malahat SkyWalk visitors embark along a 600 m (1,968 ft) elevated, wooden walkway rising 20 m (65 ft) through an arbutus and Douglas fir forest. Guests then ascend a circular ramp gently rising to the top of a 10-storey, architecturally-inspiring spiral tower lookout.

At the top of the tower, guests are 250 m (820 ft) above sea level and enjoy 360-degree views of two countries, including islands, inlets, fjords, forests and mountains in B.C. and Washington State. Also at the top, daring guests can walk on an adventure net suspended partially across the centre of the tower for another thrilling perspective.

On the descent, guests can choose to retrace their steps or take an exhilarating ride down a 20 m (65 ft) spiral slide. Available to everyone over five years of age or minimum 107 cm (42 in) tall, guests can ride as many times as they like.

Malahat SkyWalk is located on the traditional territory of the Malahat Nation and their Indigenous stories are embedded in the visitor experience.

Tickets are available online at www.malahatskywalk.com/pass and are valid for one year from date of purchase. Admission is $31.95 CAD (adult 18+), $28.95 CAD (senior 65+), $18.95 CAD (child aged 6-17) and $86.00 CAD (two adults, two children), plus taxes. Children aged five and under are free.

If you want more skywalking adventures, here are some other elevated attractions you can experience in Canada:

Columbia Icefield Skywalk
Jasper, Alberta

Step out on a cliff-edge walkway where giant glaciers perch above you and the spectacular Sunwapta Valley spreads out below. The Columbia Icefield Skywalk experience features waterfalls, wildlife, fossils and more on an exciting 1-kilometre walkway that leads to a platform where glass is all that separates you from a 918-foot (280 m) drop. The walk is presented in an interpretive storytelling format that will connect you to the natural world in a deep and meaningful way.

https://www.banffjaspercollection.com/attractions/columbia-icefield/skywalk/

Saint John Skywalk
Saint John, New Brunswick

Handout photo: Saint John Skwyalk

The Reversing Falls Rapids on the Saint John River in New Brunswick have amazed visitors for generations. As the powerful tides of the Bay of Fundy rush up the river twice per day, they reverse the direction of the river’s flow that is an unforgettable demonstration of nature’s power. Visitors can step out on the glass-bottomed skywalk that perches above the roiling waters below. There’s also an adjacent restaurant that they can visit before or after the tide’s approach

https://www.skywalksaintjohn.com

CN Tower’s Glass Floor
Toronto, Ontario

Handout photo: CN Tower

The granddaddy of all glass-bottomed attractions in Canada is the CN Tower’s glass floor that was the world’s first when it opened in 1994. A mere 2 1/2″ of glass keeps you safe from the ground which is 342 m (1,122 ft) below, but it’s strong enough that you can walk on it, or even jump on it, without worry. Despite those reassurances, you have to force your mind to tell you that it’s safe when you step out on the transparent 23.8 square metres (256 sq. ft) surface. If that’s not scary enough for you, then you might be ready for the EdgeWalk, where you walk outside the tower while attached with safety straps.

https://www.cntower.ca/en-ca/plan-your-visit/attractions/glass-floor.html